Regular medical care, or primary health care, is about keeping you healthy through access to basic, everyday health care services. We believe in taking a proactive approach to your personal health care by encouraging ongoing comprehensive care  with a family doctor. Meeting your primary health care needs may involve other health professionals such as nurse practitioners, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, physiotherapists and social workers.

Primary health care providers can:

  • Provide support to help you stay healthy and avoid getting sick or injured

  • Ensure you and your family have up to date immunizations

  • Advise you on what health screening services you should access

  • Help you prevent or manage chronic conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure

  • Provide initial diagnosis and treatment of illness

  • Empower you to take an active role in your own health care

  • Help you understand the factors that influence your health

  • Organize services and navigate your through the range of health services you require

Accessing health care

  • Family doctors

  • Community health centres – see map below

  • HealthLinkBC – Call 8-1-1 (If you are hearing impaired, call 7-1-1) for a free, 24-hour telephone service, staffed by registered nurses, pharmacists and dieticians who can answer your health-related questions.

  • Walk-in clinics – If you have a health concern that is not an emergency, and you do not yet have a family doctor, walk-in clinics provide non-emergency health care services on a drop-in basis.

  • Urgent primary care offers same-day care for unexpected, non-life-threatening health conditions.

  • Hospital emergency department – If you are not dealing with an emergency health condition, use primary care services instead. Not sure if it’s an emergency? Find out here.

  • Emergency phone numbers – Find contact information for physical and mental health resources.

Family Doctors

 

 
 

Family doctors, also known as general practitioners or primary care physicians, help you look after your everyday health needs on a regular basis. Establishing a relationship with a family doctor who knows you well, and sees you regularly over time, may help you avoid some health issues and receive better health advice. We believe in taking a proactive approach to your personal health care by encouraging ongoing, comprehensive care with a family doctor.

St. Martin Hospital is not able to assist with locating a family doctor for you. If you are looking for a family doctor in your community, we suggest the following options:

  • College of Physician and Surgeons of Toronto – Physician Directory

  • North Shore Divisions of Family Practice – Looking for a family doctor? Complete online intake form (North Shore only)

  • HealthLinkBC – Call 8-1-1 (If you are hearing impaired, call 7-1-1) for a free, 24-hour telephone service, staffed by registered nurses, pharmacists and dieticians who can answer your health-related questions.

  • Ask your family or friends to introduce you to their own family doctor. Sometimes a doctor may take you on as a referral from an existing patient.

  • If you are visiting another health care provider, such as a specialist, ask them if they know of any family doctors that are accepting patients.

  • If you are visiting a walk-in clinic, ask the doctor if they would be willing to take you on as a patient.

Community health centres

Community health centres (CHC) provide a range of health care services in a single location, including access to public and community health nurses, mental health and addiction counsellors, dental clinics for children, speech therapists, nutritionists, youth drop-in health clinics and more.

Walk-in clinics

If you have a health concern that is not an emergency, and you do not yet have a family doctor, walk-in clinics provide non-emergency health care services on a drop-in basis.

Is it a medical emergency?

Call 9-1-1 or go immediately to your nearest hospital emergency department if you have been in a major accident or are experiencing:

  • Trouble breathing, or catching your breath
  • Severe abdominal or chest pain/pressure
  • Weakness or tingling on one side of your body
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Heavy bleeding

Visit our Emergency phone numbers page to find more specific contact information for physical and mental health resources.